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The complete presentation by George O'Hanlon, founder and director of Natural Pigments, on the best practices in painting given at the Figurative Art Convention & Expo (FACE) in Miami on Friday, November 10, 2017. The lecture is based on studies of the reaction of painting supports, oils and pigments to changes in the environment during the past hundred years making it possible to understand the behavior of paintings. Modern commercial oil paints present new issues to conservators as they observe defects in paint films caused by new pigments and additives used in their formulations.

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Posted in Paints By George O'Hanlon

Rublev Colours Flemish WhiteLead sulfate (British spelling, sulphate), formed the basis of a number of white pigments that were made on a large scale in the 19th century and 20th century and sold under a variety of names, such as "Patent White Lead," "Non-poisonous White Lead," "Sublimed White Lead," etc. Some of these pigments did not consist entirely of lead sulfate but contained other minerals, such as zinc oxide, barite (barium sulfate), magnesia (magnesium carbonate), etc., in varying quantities.

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Posted in Paints Pigments By George.O'Hsnlon

Comparison of Tempera Grounds

5/26/2017 8:00 PM

A comparison of grounds for egg tempera by artist, Koo Schadler. She compares seven different grounds based on six criteria she developed for egg tempera painting. Read this article to see how they measure up.

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Posted in Grounds By Koo Schadler

Support Induced Discoloration (SID)Support Induced Discoloration (SID) occurs when paint changes color due to pulling up water-soluble substances from the substrate. As the paint dries these particles remain in the paint, discoloring it. Read how to avoid discoloration of paint on wood supports.

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Posted in Supports By George O'Hanlon

Lily, detailIt’s not possible to physically blend egg tempera paint once it’s been applied because reworking fresh paint dissolves and lifts underlying layers. Thus whatever tool is used to apply egg tempera leaves behind its mark: A brushstroke stays visibly a brushstroke, sponged on paint carries the imprint of the sponge. This “mark making” tendency means egg tempera is ideal for rendering fine details, crisp textural effects, and other linear elements. The challenge in tempera is to create smooth, mark-free transitions.

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Posted in Paints By Koo Schadler

Tempera is a method of painting with pigments dispersed in a binder that is miscible with water. Although the term is typically associated with egg yolk as the binder, it is also applied to paints made with casein, gum or animal collagen (hide glue). The method was known from the classical world, and was the principal medium used for panel painting and illuminated manuscripts in the Byzantine world and Medieval and Early Renaissance Europe. This article examines the type of supports used today for tempera and the best practice of preparing them for tempera painting using a new ground, Tempera Ground, made by Natural Pigments.

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Posted in Grounds Supports By George O'Hanlon

Teresa Oaxaca has been making use of transparent pigments for about a year and a half now and a blog post of this nature has been on her to do list ever since. Seldom very popular (unless the paint tube is labeled the ever famous "transparent oxide yellow"), little known and less understood, most people question why someone would want to go to the trouble of producing let alone painting with a weak pigment. In the age of cadmiums and and other bright hi-keyed pigments, earth colors have at turns come into question. Why not mix down? Why settle for a lower chroma?

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Posted in Paints Pigments By Teresa Oaxaca

Syndics of the Drapers' GuildIt is an old saying that rules are meant to be broken. No one did this more successfully than Rembrandt. For instance, the rich red in the table cloth in the Syndics is obtained by glazing a translucent red over brown, instead of over a brighter red. Rules are meant to be broken, but it is necessary to know first what the rules are. Read more about these painting rules.

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Posted in Paints By George O'Hanlon

Cracks caused by poking canvasFor over a hundred years, most of the causes of cracking have been explored: humidity and temperature, expansion and contraction, stress, and paint embrittlement. The symptoms were obvious—cracking and paint loss—but the causes were not clearly understood. In 1982, Marion Mecklenburg and other scientists at the Smithsonian Institute, reported the first systematic explanation of painting mechanics, and especially that of canvas paintings

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Posted in Supports By George O'Hanlon

This rule appears to confuse so many artists or ignored completely by others. Perhaps a better way to express the rule "always paint fat on lean" is always paint a slower drying paint film over a faster drying film. Think in terms of the last applied paint film being more flexible than the paint film underneath. Another way to clarify this rule is to think of adding a little more oil in the last application of paint than was included in the paint layer just covered, or not to dilute with solvent the last applied layer anymore than the previous one was thinned.

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Posted in The Director's Blog Paints By George O'Hanlon

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