Welcome to Natural Pigments' online store

Call toll-free 1-888-361-5900

FREE SHIPPING

FOR ORDERS OVER $150

Read more about our free shipping program

34 Products

Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
option
Set Ascending Direction

Lord Heathfield of Gibraltar by Joshua Reynolds (1723-1792), 1787, oil on canvas, 142 x 113.5 cm (55.9 x 44.7 in.), National Gallery, LondonResins-based mediums are those made with resin dissolved in a solvent, such as dammar spirit varnish (dammar or damar in turpentine), mastic spirit varnish (mastic gum dissolved in turpentine) or megilp (oil and resin based medium and later Maroger mediums) added to oil paint. Resin-based mediums and varnishes have become popular additions to oil paint since the nineteenth century.

Aside from picture varnishes, the major use of resins in oil paintings were glazes. The use of resinous mediums in oil paint is certainly not new. Researchers have found natural resins, such as mastic and, more commonly, those from pine trees, in the earliest European oil paintings of the fifteenth century. However, the use of natural resins in oil paint was confined to specific passages of paintings. It was not until the latter half of the eighteenth century do we find paint films incorporating resins throughout paintings.

Read More
Posted in Mediums By George O'Hanlon

Poppet, Katherine Stone, 2015, oil on panel, 20 x 30 inches

Katherine Stone, an artist living on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, uses a palette based primarily on earth colors from Rublev Colours Artists Oils and other Rublev Colours oil painting mediums, such as Velazquez Medium. In this article, she discusses her technique in the portrait painting Poppet, which is one of the finalists in the 2015 Portrait Society of America competition.

Read More
Posted in Mediums By Katherine Stone

Resins and Balsams

2/7/2014 10:00 PM

The word resin when used in its most specific sense is a hydrocarbon secretion of many plants, particularly coniferous trees. The resin produced by these plants is a viscous liquid, composed mainly of volatile terpenes. Oleoresins are naturally occurring mixtures of oil and resin. Other resinous products in their natural condition are a mixture of gum or mucilaginous substances and are known as "gum resins." Mastic gum is a good example of a gum resin.

Read More
Posted in The Director's Blog Mediums Varnish By George O'Hanlon

Oleogel Road Test

10/8/2013 12:00 PM

The Artist's Magazine October 2013Oleogel was featured in Rob Anderson's Road Test column in the October 2013 issue of The Artist's Magazine. Rob writes about Oleogel: “What exactly does adding Oleogel to paint do? Oleogel maintains the body of the paint—say goodbye, in other words, to drippy paint—at the same time it increases the paint’s transparency. The medium is versatile enough that it can be used for a thick impasto and also for glazing. The fact that this medium is this versatile is something I’ve never seen before. In my experience, a medium typically is only good for one thing, either glazing or helping to extend and thicken the paint, but not both. All in all, I had a very positive experience using Oleogel. The increase in fluidity and simultaneous control were wonderful surprises. I plan on continuing to use the medium, making it a part of my painting process.”

Read More
Posted in The Director's Blog Mediums By George O'Hanlon

Six Ways I Use Oleogel

9/30/2013 12:00 PM

Kate Stone paintingI push Oleogel on all my friends and I've even done time for selling it in a schoolyard. After using it regularly for the past year and half I've come up with a variety of uses for it and I thought I might share them.

For those who haven't come across this term before,"couche" is French for "paint layer," and in the context of classical technique, a couche is a thin layer of oil that you spread over an area that you are about to work on, usually an area that you are going to bring to a finish with fine detail and blending. The oil makes the fresh paint flow onto the surface better (great if you're working with tiny amounts of paint on little itty bitty brushes) and at the same time saturates the old paint layer so that you can match your colours perfectly. Snort. As if anyone manages that.

Read More
Posted in Mediums By Kate Stone

Alpine by Julio Reyes (detail)The simplest way to create an impasto surface is to apply paint in large amounts, usually with either a brush or palette knife. Commercial oil colors have a heavy consistency, so this can be achieved by working directly from the tube applying the colors in thick layers. Opacity and built-up texture are usually interrelated, with much of the thickest impasto consisting of solid and opaque pigments, such as lead white or titanium white. Passages of thickly applied paint can also be translucent, so extender pigments are chosen that supply both bulk and transparency.

Read More
Posted in Mediums Paints By George O'Hanlon

Rembrandt Jewish BrideImpasto is paint laid on a canvas or panel in quantities that make it stand out from the surface and is usually thick enough that brush or palette knife strokes are visible. The first known use of the word was in 1784, from Italian impasto, the noun of the verb impastare “to put in paste.”

The heavy viscosity and slow drying time of oil paint makes it a suitable medium for impasto painting technique. Watercolor and tempera paint are not satisfactory for this technique because they lack these properties and do not form continuous films surrounding pigment particles.

Read More
Posted in Mediums Paints By George O'Hanlon

Drying Oils Used in Painting

6/10/2013 11:00 AM

Linseed oilWhere do all the different brands of drying oils in artists’ supply shops originate? Artists’ materials manufacturers do not process their own oil, but rather purchase it in bulk from large industrial sources. For example, there are two major producers of linseed oil in North America and several in Europe, but there are many brands of linseed and stand oils offered by artist materials companies. Artist materials companies do not have the resources to process linseed oil, which today is a very specialized and large-scale industry.

Read More
Posted in Mediums Paints By George O'Hanlon

Clove Oil in Oil Paint

6/10/2013 1:07 AM

Clove oil 2 fl ozWe are often asked about the use of clove oil to retard the drying of oil paint. Like many others, you may have heard that it darkens upon exposure to light.

Clove oil works well as a retarder but there is a note of caution: over time (a long time) it does actually darken as it dries. It starts off nice a light but can eventually turn black. This is over years and is dependent on the amount of direct light. I would be tempted to use a different oil as a retarder—linseed or stand oil—and if my tubes go solid I would revive these with solvent and oils.

Read More

Tags:

Posted in Mediums Paints By George O'Hanlon

Francisco Benitez, Flight in WinterFrancisco Benitez considers himself an atemporal archaeologist who excavates lost and forgotten styles of painting long assigned to the shadows to reveal the ever-transient nature of the human psyche. Trained in a rigorous atelier program at the Art Student’s League in New York, he frequented museums and copied old master paintings in order to master their techniques and conceptual strategies.

Read More
Posted in Mediums Paints By George O'Hanlon

34 Products

Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
option
Set Ascending Direction

Newsletter

 

  • paypal
  • express
  • master card
  • visa
  • discover