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Items 1 to 10 of 14 total

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A comparison of grounds for egg tempera by artist, Koo Schadler. She compares seven different grounds based on six criteria she developed for egg tempera painting. Read this article to see how they measure up.

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5/26/2017 8:00 PM By Koo Schadler Grounds,

Tempera is a method of painting with pigments dispersed in a binder that is miscible with water. Although the term is typically associated with egg yolk as the binder, it is also applied to paints made with casein, gum or animal collagen (hide glue). The method was known from the classical world, and was the principal medium used for panel painting and illuminated manuscripts in the Byzantine world and Medieval and Early Renaissance Europe. This article examines the type of supports used today for tempera and the best practice of preparing them for tempera painting using a new ground, Tempera Ground, made by Natural Pigments.

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3/29/2017 5:00 PM By George O'Hanlon Grounds, Supports,

Eislandschaft mit Schlittschuhläufern by Jan van GoyenOil paint darkens and becomes increasingly translucent as it ages. These changes may cause visible disfigurement of paintings and, although the phenomenon has been extensively studied, the causes are not definitely known at present. This article presents evidence that demonstrates how improper technique and materials in the ground layer can lead to ruined paintings.

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2/27/2015 1:00 AM By George O'Hanlon Grounds, Paints,

Cennino Cennini's Il Libro del ArteLearning from artists manuscripts, a contemporary artist adapts a 15th century recipe for preparing grounds for oil painting on wood panels. In her book, The Art of Arts, Anita Albus discusses materials and practices of oil and tempera painting that have either been lost or fallen into disuse. Albus makes a poignant observation that ever since the industrial revolution, it has been industry that dictates what materials are available to artists. Gesso production falls into this category alongside the preparation of paints and mediums. Artists have succumbed to the materials handed to us. She reminds us that prior to industrialization and typical of the European artists guilds of the 15th and 16th century; it was largely the artists themselves that prepared their own formulas and concoctions in painting.

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7/1/2014 12:45 AM By Tom Irizarry Grounds, Recipes,

GlossaryThe meaning of terms used in fine art painting.

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6/10/2013 12:05 AM By George O'Hanlon Grounds, Mediums, Paints, Pigments, Supports, Varnish,

Rublev Colours Lead Oil Ground Quart 32 fl oz (0.95 L)Since the 1970s, it has become difficult to buy lead white in linseed oil to prime canvases and panels. As a result, artists who wish to use oil priming for their supports usually must substitute other materials for the lead white in linseed oil. Read this article on preparing canvas and wood panels with lead white oil primer. Some manufacturers of artists' materials still sell lead white oil paint in cans and large-capacity tubes. It should be noted, however, that most, if not all, of these lead white artists' oil colors are ground in safflower oil or poppy seed oil and not in linseed oil.

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6/9/2013 11:00 PM By George O'Hanlon Grounds,

As a painter who began working about 43 years ago, I have been fascinated by the techniques of the great masters of painting. In the last 20 years, I have spent much of my time trying to understand their approach to painting, materials and specific practice. I have spent much of my time in a relatively narrow area of study, although I have picked up little bits from the early Flemish painters all the way to nineteenth century Academy painting. However, my real concentration has been on those painters that moved me the most in face-to-face museum confrontation. They are Rubens, Velázquez, Titian, Leonardo and Rembrandt. Their technique seems to be shrouded in great mystery and, while artists and educators have written about them over the last several hundred years, much of it is contradictory. There are a few exceptions and the book recently published by Virgil Elliott entitled Traditional Oil Painting is a great advance forward when compared to most of what has been previously written on the subject. Ernest van de Wetering's book, Rembrandt: The Painter at Work, provides some keys to understanding his materials and working techniques both early and late in his career. There is also a wonderful publication entitled Art in the Making, Rembrandt, published by the National Gallery of London that gives considerable insight into Rembrandt's technique.

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6/9/2013 8:33 PM By Kenneth Freed Grounds,

Wood Panel Cross SectionPart one on preparing wood panels for painting with the application of chalk grounds, and fifth in our technical series on painting icons, this article discusses the history and materials used in the preparation of wood panels for tempera painting — size, pavoloka and gesso — since the earliest period of Christian art until today. While the series specifically applies to making icon boards and preparing them for painting egg tempera icons, it has application to preparing wood panels for painting in any medium on chalk grounds.

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6/9/2013 4:00 PM By George O'Hanlon Grounds, Sizes - Adhesives, Supports,

The technique followed by painters in medieval Western Europe to prepare and paint tempera panels and that used by painters in Russia of the same period are closely allied. However, there are some differences in the process from the preparation of the panel to the final varnish. These differences are interesting to note and can provide some insight into the technique and process used by the earliest Byzantine artists to make panel paintings.

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6/9/2013 2:15 PM By George O'Hanlon Drawing, Grounds, Paints, Pigments,

GOLD... This precious metal fascinated medieval society. It represented spiritual, transcendental light, and expressed divine intelligence. The medieval love of gold is exemplified during the Byzantine period, when the establishment of the Church inspired resplendent domes, mosaics, icons, and architecture—each brushed with the light of God. Illuminated manuscripts echoed these achievements in miniature, capturing minute reflections of medieval life and devotion. Gold became an intrinsic element of the illuminated page, and borders, initials, backgrounds, and letters provided many opportunities for spiritual expression.

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6/9/2013 12:40 AM By Angela Lucas Gilding, Grounds,

Items 1 to 10 of 14 total

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