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Blue Pigments: 5000 Years of Art and Industry

151-1904982371


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$95.00

Quick Overview

The primary goal of Blue Pigments is to show how much ingenuity man has needed to employ in order to make blue materials. From Egyptian blue to copper phthalocyanine, ranging through Maya and Han blues, smalt, blue ashes, Prussian blue and artificial ultramarine, we cannot help but be in awe of the variety of technical solutions found. Each civilization has produced its own solution, or sequence of solutions. Thus one can say that blue pigments can be considered as markers of civilizations.

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Blue Pigments: 5000 Years of Art and Industry
Author: Francois Delamare
ISBN-10: 1904982379
ISBN-13: 978-1904982371
Publisher:
Archetype Publications, 2009
Size: 189 x 20 x 249 mm (7.4 x 0.9 x 9.8 inches). 442 pages. Illustrations: 68 pages of color and halftone images and diagrams. Paperback.

In the natural world, blue rocks from which objects can be fashioned are rare—a few marbles, lapis-lazuli and related rocks, and minerals containing copper. However those which, once ground, can be used as pigments are exceptional. Only lapis-lazuli and azurite come to mind. The long absence of blues from the palettes of our distant ancestors is therefore easy to explain as is the fact that blue pigments have always been an expensive commodity which became the objects of a very lucrative trade, spanning continents and oceans.

The primary goal of this book is to show how much ingenuity man has needed to employ in order to make blue materials. From Egyptian blue to copper phthalocyanine, ranging through Maya and Han blues, smalt, blue ashes, Prussian blue and artificial ultramarine, we cannot help but be in awe of the variety of technical solutions found. Each civilization has produced its own solution, or sequence of solutions. Thus one can say that blue pigments can be considered as markers of civilizations.

Contents: Egyptian blue, the blue pigment of Mediterranean antiquity: From Egyptian history to Roman caeruleum

Zaffre, smalt, bleu d'esmail and azure: Tribulations of Saxon cobalt

Natural ultramarine: The essence of the blue pigment

German azurite and English blue verditer: Favorite pigments of European painters

Prussian blue: An unexpected destiny

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