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Zinc Oxide

275-31


Availability: In stock

Processing time: Usually ships within 24 hours.

Quick Overview

Zinc Oxide aqueous pigment dispersion, more commonly known as zinc white, is a synthetic white pigment with good hiding power, nontoxic, permanent, and usable in most medium.

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Image Product Name Price Safety Shipping Qty
Zinc Oxide 2 fl oz
$14.95

Details

Zinc oxide is one of the principal white pigments developed in the 18th century, but became popular in art only until after the 1850s. It was more commonly known as zinc white or Chinese white.

Rublev Colours Aqueous Dispersions are pigments dispersed in water ready to be mixed with water-based mediums. These dispersions are especially made for use with traditional painting mediums, such as egg tempera, casein tempera, fresco, watercolors and distemper (glue tempera). They are also ideally suited for use with gesso to make toned grounds for drawing and painting. Pigment dispersions from Rublev Colours contain only naturally-derived ingredients, in addition to pigment and water, making them ideally suited for traditional mediums. Unlike other pigment dispersions that are typically made for acrylic medium, Rublev Colours Aqueous Dispersions do not contain coalescent solvents, artificial dispersing resins and other additives that interfere with natural mediums. Aqueous Dispersions make preparing traditional mediums easy; you do not have to hassle with powders, grinding pigments in medium and calculating binder ratios to make water-based paint. They make adding the right amount of paint binder, such as egg yolk, a no brainer because the right amount of water is already contained in the dispersion, simply add egg yolk.

Pigment Names
Common Names: English: zinc oxide, zinc white
French: oxyde de zinc, blanc de zinc
German: Zinkoxid, Zinkweiss
Italian: oxido di zinco, bianco di zinco
Russian: цинковые белина
Spanish: oxido de cinc, blanco de cinc
Alternate Names: Chinese white

Origin and History
Zinc oxide or more commonly known in the art world as zinc white is one of the three white pigments -- lead, titanium and zinc -- used extensively for artistic and decorative paints. Although known since ancient times, zinc white apparently was not seriously considered an artists' pigment until after the 1850s. The widest application of the pure pigment has been in watercolors, sold under the name Chinese white, but is found often in mixtures with other pigments in oil and acrylic paints.

Source
Zinc oxide is widely available today, manufactured by numerous companies. The manufacturing process of zinc oxide is designated in commerce as the "indirect" or "French process" zinc oxide made from the metal and the "direct" or "American process," which is zinc oxide made from the ore and, hence, traditionally somewhat less pure. The terms nodular and acicular are used to describe the particle shapes.

Permanence and Compatibility
Zinc oxide paints tend to retain their original whiteness during aging, not only in watercolor but to a great extent in oil paint as well. Compared with other white pigments ground with oil, zinc oxide often exhibits the least tendency to yellow. The pigment tends to react with fatty acids present in drying oil, leading to the formation of zinc soaps. A soap is a metal salt of an organic acid. The reactivity of zinc oxide is affected by the particle size and morphology, with smaller particles being more reactive. In the case of linseed oil, the formation of zinc soaps from zinc oxide tends to harden the paint film. A 28-year study completed in 2007 by Mecklenburg and Tumosa of the Smithsonian Institution shows that zinc oxide can cause brittleness and delamination of oil paint film even when zinc oxide is used in small amounts. Zinc oxide has a tendency to catalyze the formation of hydrogen peroxide when irradiated by near ultraviolet light. This reaction and the formation of zinc soaps can cause chalking and embrittlement of oil paints films. In view of these recent findings, we do not recommend the use zinc white in the ground or underlayers of an oil painting and caution its use in all oil paint.

Zinc white is compatible with all inorganic pigments. It is stable toward light in the sense that it does not discolor. However, owing to its photochemical reactivity, zinc oxide will affect the fading of various organic pigments. Zinc white will accelerate the light fading process of artists' paint that contain organic pigments, such as madder lake, alizarin lake and Prussian blue.

Oil Absorption and Grinding
Zinc oxide absorbs a moderate amount of oil. The oil absorption ratio varies considerably at least from 20-25%, depending on the particle size and shape. Certain manufacturing procedures make it possible to produce pigment grades that demand less oil, 14-15% oil in paste.

Toxicity
Zinc oxide is not considered to be hazardous, but care should be used in handling the dry powder pigment to avoid inhaling the dust.

Rublev Colours Pigment: Zinc Oxide
Rublev Colours Pigment: Zinc Oxide

Pigment Information
Color: White
Colour Index: Pigment White 4 (77947)
Chemical Name: Zinc(II) Oxide
Chemical Formula: ZnO
ASTM Lightfastness Rating
Acrylic: I
Oil: I
Watercolor: I
Properties
Specific Gravity: 5.4-5.7
Hardness: 4
Refractive Index: ε=2.02, ω=2.00


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